(Reblogged from nolandwithoutstones)
a-raf:



The poem “(Stray) Bullet” by Lebanese-Palestinian poet, Mazen Maarouf, is written exactly once in the Diwani Jali Arabic calligraphy script to create the image of a man (bearing the likeness of Mazen, himself) being struck by a stylized bullet.
This piece was one of eight designs, commissioned by Reels Festivals to accompany their poetry publication featuring contemporary poets from Lebanon, Syria, and Scotland. One piece was commissioned for each of the eight poets featured in the festival. In preparation for the festival, all of the poets travelled to Lebanon in order to translate each others poems from Arabic to English and vice versa, this is one of those recently translated poems.
By Everitte Barbee

a-raf:

The poem “(Stray) Bullet” by Lebanese-Palestinian poet, Mazen Maarouf, is written exactly once in the Diwani Jali Arabic calligraphy script to create the image of a man (bearing the likeness of Mazen, himself) being struck by a stylized bullet.

This piece was one of eight designs, commissioned by Reels Festivals to accompany their poetry publication featuring contemporary poets from Lebanon, Syria, and Scotland. One piece was commissioned for each of the eight poets featured in the festival. In preparation for the festival, all of the poets travelled to Lebanon in order to translate each others poems from Arabic to English and vice versa, this is one of those recently translated poems.

By Everitte Barbee

(Reblogged from pax-arabica)

Such keys are kept as mementos by many Palestinians who left their homes in 1948, and are a common Palestinian symbol of support for the right of return.

(Source: ftyani)

(Reblogged from nolandwithoutstones)

nikolawashere:

Girls from a West Bank village cool off in the Dead Sea.
By Paolo Pellegrin

(Reblogged from somepalestiniankid)

uhpersonal:

arabface:

theuncolonizedmind:

in what world. IN WHAT WORLD DOES THIS EXIST.

#showthosewhitewomenhowtomove

YALLA

OHHHH DAMN

This must be reblogged again

(Reblogged from khomush)

ladycamafeo:

coffeeandsleeping:

yanorayanora:

hierarchical-aestheticism:

The idea is sound but it could have been executed better in a few areas.

W h a t

I rarely even bother arguing with tumblr’s own little racist community and usually my strategy is just to ignore their existence but I’m bored and I like traditional clothes- anyway: If you guys actually think that by googling “niqab” and then posting 8 images you are proving anything about the ethnicities in question or Muslims in general, anything relevant at all, then hah. Hahahhahahahaahahah. Like, I can imagine that whoever created this photo thought it’s some kind of masterpiece and probably sat there mumbling alone in a dark room “LoOK I hAvE pRoVEN thAT THE IsLaMS R STuPID I aM a GENIUS!!1” but ffs this is embarrassing and the only thing it proves is your almost laughable ignorance on Iraqi, Saudi, Afghan, Iranian, Pakistani, Syrian, Yemeni and Egyptian culture. Will you see some women wearing some sort of religious headwear in all of these countries? Sure you will, and frankly I don’t think they give a fuck about random people on tumblr not thinking they’re 〜diverse〜 enough. It doesn’t mean that every single woman from any of these ethnic groups are niqab-wearers or that these people don’t have a history, culture and heritage of their own, aren’t unique and don’t deserve to be recognized as such. Idk I could keep talking about this but it seems like a waste of time but here:

Egyptian women

Egyptian clothes from a fashion show organized by Shahira Mehrez (who works on the revival of Egyptian clothing,she’s collected Egyptian traditional clothes&jewelry from different parts of the country)

Afghan clothing

Girl from Yemen

Pakistani bridal wear

This is from a show in Baghdad, clothes inspired by Iraqi folklore

Persian dancers

Syrian clothes in a shop

Syrian dancer

And finally: there’s a whole damn website dedicated to the costumes of the different tribes in Saudi Arabia.

(+ Major regional differences within every country.) This post also makes no sense because anyone who has visited the European countries in question knows that traditional clothes isn’t exactly something people usually wear on a daily basis. Go to Denmark for example; it’s quite rare to see people actually wearing traditional dresses all the time, they are often reserved for special occasions or for folk dancers. Like you’re more likely to see people wearing jeans and a t-shirt?? I could easily make a photoset of Danish, Austrian, Finnish, Spanish, Italian, German, British and Scottish people all wearing the same clothes and based on that go claiming that these people don’t have their own culture and traditions and aren’t diverse or whatever, but I won’t because it’s obviously false. Anyone who knows anything about Europe knows that these “All European countries are the same” “Europeans don’t have a culture of their own” statements going around are just weird.

Btw I feel like I have to mention that the photo representing Finnish clothing is not Finnish at all. As suspected, y’all don’t know shit about the precious European ethnicities either lol. The woman in the photo is actually Turkish which makes this 10 times funnier to me since you know, Turkey is a country with a quite large *gasp* Muslim population. Here is the source for the photo. Congratulations, not only did you fail to prove that the different ethnicities of which some or a majority are Muslims don’t have a culture of their own but you don’t know anything about the different European peoples you pretend to care about so much lmao.

If you guys actually at some point in your lives take any real interest in Finland instead of just using it as some little pawn in your shitty racist posts, here’s some examples of Finnish clothing

B y e

Reblogging for the massive ass kicking. As well as the freaking Pakistani bridal wear ohmygoodnessitssopretty

Best post ever

(Reblogged from laskladsm-deactivated20131226)

thepeoplesrecord:

Iraq war claimed half a million lives, study finds
October 21, 2013

The number of deaths caused by the Iraq war has been a source of intense controversy, as politics, inexact science and a clamor for public awareness have intersected in a heated debate of conflicting interests. The latest and perhaps most rigorous survey, released Tuesday, puts the figure at close to 500,000.

The study, — a collaboration of researchers in the U.S., Canada and Iraq appearing in the journal PLoS Medicine — included a survey of 2,000 Iraqi households in 100 geographic regions in Iraq. Researchers used two surveys, one involving the household and another asking residents about their siblings, in an attempt to demonstrate the accuracy of the data they were collecting. Using data from these surveys, researchers estimated 405,000 deaths, with another 55,800 projected deaths from the extensive migration in and emigration from Iraq occurring as a result of the war.

The researchers estimated that 60 percent of the deaths were violent, with the remaining 40 percent occurring because of the health-infrastructure issues that arose as a result of the invasion — a point they emphasized in discussing their research, since the figure is higher than those found in previous studies.

“I hope that one of the takeaways from this paper will be that when we invade a country, there are many health consequences that aren’t directly related to violence,” said study author Amy Hagopian, program director of the community-oriented public-health practice at the University of Washington School of Public Health. She said approximately half those deaths were attributed to inadequate treatment for cardiovascular disease.

To conduct the household surveys, researchers worked with volunteer Iraqi scientists and improved on the methods used for similar surveys in the past. Because the survey was conducted in mid-2011, researchers were able to access more areas of the country safely. The households surveyed were chosen by a grid placed on Google Maps, and a home was selected by a quadrant in that grid from randomly generated numbers. Ultimately, the researchers were able to survey twice as many areas as previous studies and had a more random selection of homes, avoiding the past problems of home selection by the survey takers on the ground, who may have been more likely to approach homes along more-traveled streets.

The more thorough investigation may negate some of the criticism levied against past studies on Iraqi mortality after the invasion, which were published in the medical journal The Lancet in 2004 and 2006. The 2006 study in particular was a subject of scrutiny because it estimated a toll of 655,000 excess deaths, mostly violent, at a time when other surveys had five-digit death tolls.

Full article

(Reblogged from navigatethestream)
Colonialism is the massive fog that has clouded our imaginations regarding who we could be, excised our memories of who we once were, and numbed our understanding of our current existence.

Waziyatawin 

You cannot have colonialism without genocide.

(via cuntymint)

I will always reblog this quote. It hits my heart.

(via blackinasia)
(Reblogged from owning-my-truth)
The United States of America is prepared to use all elements of our power, including military force, to secure our core interests in the region. We will confront external aggression against our allies and partners, as we did in the Gulf War. We will ensure the free flow of energy from the region to the world.

Your favorite Nobel Peace Prize winning President Obama.

I’ve written and shared countless posts, stats, images and analyses to tell you all about American’s imperialism and Obama’s shameless neo-con policies, and I have been endlessly harassed by pro-Obama liberals who insist that the remaining world continue to suffer under the ill-founded logic of “lesser evil” and I still continue highlighting how utterly blind and cruel U.S. imperialism is. If this speech by Obama does not demonstrate the genocidal, warmongering apparatus of the United States of America, I don’t know what will. 

(via mehreenkasana)

(Reblogged from the-uncensored-she)

zamaaanawal:

1960s in the Arab world.

(Reblogged from theuncolonizedmind)
isqineeha:

Intifada (1988) - Syrian Artist EDWARD SHAHDA

isqineeha:

Intifada (1988) - Syrian Artist EDWARD SHAHDA

(Reblogged from theuncolonizedmind)

theuncolonizedmind:

in what world. IN WHAT WORLD DOES THIS EXIST.

#showthosewhitewomenhowtomove

YALLA

(Reblogged from theuncolonizedmind)
karmakaram:

Basra, Iraq (“Iraq’s Venice”), 1950s, featuring the former flag of Iraq circa 1921-1959

karmakaram:

Basra, Iraq (“Iraq’s Venice”), 1950s, featuring the former flag of Iraq circa 1921-1959

(Reblogged from alscientist)
(Reblogged from the-uncensored-she)